• Minor Head Injuries in Children

    Almost all children bump their heads every now and then. While these injuries can be upsetting, most head injuries are minor and do not cause serious problems. In very rare cases, problems can occur after a minor bump on the head. This publication was written by the American Academy of Pediatrics to

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  • Head Lice

    Though head lice may be a nuisance, they don’t cause serious illness or carry any diseases. Head lice can be treated at home, but it’s important to check with the doctor first.

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  • Middle Ear Fluid and Your Child

    The middle ear is the space behind the eardrum that is usually filled with air. When a child has middle ear fluid (otitis media with effusion), it means that a watery or mucus-like fluid has collected in the middle ear. Otitis media means middle ear inflammation, and effusion means fluid.

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  • Nursemaid's Elbow

    A pulled elbow (also known as nursemaid’s elbow) is a common, painful injury generally among children under four years old but occasionally older. It occurs when the outer part of the elbow becomes dislocated or slips out of its joint.

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  • MMR (Measles, Mumps & Rubella) Vaccine: What You Need to Know (VIS)

    Measles, mumps, and rubella are serious diseases. Before vaccines they were very common, especially among children.

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  • Meningococcal Disease: Information for Teens and College Students

    Certain teens and young adults have a higher risk of getting meningococcal disease. College students, especially freshmen who live in dorms and military recruits, are at an increased risk compared with others in this age group. It's important to know how to protect yourself because meningococcal disease

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  • Diarrhea

    An illness in which someone develops more watery and frequent stools than is typical for that person. Diarrhea can be caused by changes in diet, such as drinking excessive amount of fruit juice, eating more than the usual amounts of certain foods, and the use of some medications. Diarrhea also can be

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  • Ear Infection

    There are 2 common types of ear infections: otitis media (middle ear infection) and otitis externa (swimmer’s ear). Most ear infections of young children occur in the middle ear.

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  • Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)

    Babies with GERD can choke; a bulb syringe should be available to help clear the airway if necessary. If the baby is coughing, nothing should be done because the cough is the most effective way to clear the airway. If the baby stops breathing or making any sound, CPR techniques for infants should be

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  • Allergic Skin Conditions

    Estimates are that up to 20% of infants and young children may be affected by eczema at some point. There is no good data about how frequently hives and contact dermatitis occur.

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  • Allergies: An Overview

    Allergies are very common. In a national study of children with special health care needs, 53% had allergies of some type.

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  • Lactose Intolerance and Your Child

    After drinking milk or eating ice cream, does your child have stomach cramps or get diarrhea? If so, your child may have lactose intolerance.

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  • Anaphylaxis

    The key adaptation to avoiding anaphylaxis is to try to avoid the allergen. This may mean

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  • Asthma

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases in children, affecting between 5% and 10%.

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  • Lyme Disease

    Lyme disease is an important public health problem in some areas of the United States. Since its discovery in Lyme, CT, in 1975, thousands of cases of the disease have been reported across the United States and around the world. By knowing more about the disease and how to prevent it, you can help keep

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  • Inhaled and Intranasal Corticosteroids and Your Child

    If your child has asthma or allergic rhinitis (hay fever), your pediatrician may prescribe a corticosteroid, also commonly referred to as a steroid. These medicines are the best available to decrease the swelling and irritation (inflammation) that occurs with persistent asthma or allergy. They are not

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Pediatras en Bloomington, Illinois

Monday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Saturday:

8:00 am to 12:00 pm **Sólo citas del mismo día, urgencias o por enfermedad

Sunday:

Closed